Research News

  • Study Finds Lowering Nicotine Reduces Smoking Addictiveness in Vulnerable Populations
    A JAMA Network Open study, led by Stephen T. Higgins, Ph.D., director of the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of Medicine, provides evidence that, even in smokers from vulnerable populations, reducing nicotine content to low levels decreases addictiveness – a timely finding as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers a policy to lower nicotine content in all cigarettes sold in the U.S.
  • UVM Scientist Plays Lead Role in #BlackinCardio Campaign
    Organized by Black physicians and scientists in the United States and abroad, the #BlackInCardio movement celebrates Black researchers, clinicians, and professionals in cardiovascular fields and raises awareness of cardiovascular diseases that disproportionately effect the Black community. From October 19 - October 25, the new organization will host its first annual #BlackInCardio week.
  • Diehl & Colleagues Uncover Critical Information about COVID-19 Immune Response
    New research, published in Clinical and Translational Immunology by UVM Associate Professor Sean Diehl, Ph.D., and colleagues provides a clearer picture of the protective antibodies induced by the SARS-C0V-2 virus and their role in serious illness and what’s needed for full protection.
  • Majumdar Research Shows How SARS-CoV-2 Robs Cell’s Ability to Sound Alarm and Fight
    New research, published by scientists at the University of Vermont and Caltech in the journal Cell, has pinpointed three specific mechanisms that allow SARS-CoV-2 to incapacitate human cells by disabling the cell’s alarm system to call for help or warn nearby cells of infection.
  • Nelson Delivers NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture
    Internationally recognized cerebral blood flow expert and University of Vermont Distinguished Professor and Chair of Pharmacology Mark Nelson, Ph.D., delivered a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture, titled “Translating Thought into Blood Flow in the Brain: Capillaries as Sensors of Neural Activity,” on October 14.
  • Botten, Bruce & Colleagues' Study Describes Streamlined COVID-19 Test
    A team of scientists at the University of Vermont, working in partnership with a group at the University of Washington, has developed a method of testing for the COVID-19 virus that doesn’t make use of these chemicals but still delivers an accurate result, paving the way for inexpensive, widely available testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.
  • UVM & VT United Ways Survey Puts Health Priority-Setting in Hands of Community
    Vermont United Ways and the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont are providing Vermonters with a say in prioritizing community health needs via a survey that is the largest and most comprehensive public health project ever conducted by UVM medical students.
  • New $5.4 Million NIH Grant Funds UVM Center for Biomedical Shared Resources ​
    A new $5.47 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine will support the creation of the UVM Center for Biomedical Shared Resources. The grant will fund completion of the Center's home on the first floor of the new Firestone Medical Research Building, which will be located on the south end of the Larner College of Medicine complex.
  • Plante Appointed Bloomfield Professor
    Timothy Plante ’06 M.D.’10, M.H.S., assistant professor of medicine, has been appointed the Martin E. Bloomfield ’56 M.D.’60 and Judith S. Bloomfield ’59 Early Career Professor in Cardiovascular Research at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of Medicine.
  • Larner Team Plays Role in NIH COVID-19 Blood Clotting Treatment Trials
    The University of Vermont (UVM) is participating in a major national research effort to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of varying types of blood thinners to treat adults diagnosed and hospitalized with COVID-19—the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2.