Research News

  • Rawson Study Demonstrates Hub & Spoke Model Impact on Opioid Addiction
  • Bonney Appointed to 5-Year Term on NICHD Board of Scientific Counselors
    Elizabeth Bonney, M.D., M.P.H., professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the UVM Larner College of Medicine, was appointed to a five-year term on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Division of Intramural Research.
  • A Cyber Approach to ACL Rehab: Toth & Skalka’s BME Grant Breaks New Ground
    In early 2017, University of Vermont researchers Michael Toth, Ph.D., and Christian Skalka, Ph.D. were awarded one of two inaugural UVM Biomedical Engineering (BME) Pilot Research Program grants for their project, “Cyber-physical system innovations to monitor and improve compliance with at-home neuromuscular rehabilitation.” Through the project, Toth and Skalka have worked to create a cyber-physical electrical stimulation system that acts as a bridge therapy for patients immediately post-injury and in the time between surgery and the start of physical therapy.
  • Wallace Elected Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science
    Susan Wallace, Ph.D., professor and chair of microbiology and molecular genetics at the Larner College of Medicine and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at the University of Vermont, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.
  • Cushman Presents Study on Increased TV Viewing & Blood Clot Risks at AHA
    Risk of blood clots increases with the amount of time spent watching television, even if people get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017 in Anaheim, Calif. November 11 to 15, 2017.
  • Celebrating Excellence in Research at the College – 2017 Achievements
    Vermont is among the top ten states in per capita research funding in the U.S., according to a State of Research at the College presentation delivered by Larner College of Medicine Senior Associate Dean for Research Gordon Jensen, M.D., Ph.D., at the Dean’s Excellence in Research Awards event held November 13, 2017. The last of three 2017 Celebrating Excellence in Research events held at the College on November 10 and 13, 2017, the awards ceremony recognized the accomplishments of faculty, residents, medical students, graduate students and postdoctoral trainees.
  • Nathan Finds Stress Management Training Benefits Health Care Professionals
    New interdisciplinary research conducted by University of Vermont researcher Jane Nathan, Ph.D., and colleagues, has found that the Benson Henry Institute’s (BHI) evidence-based Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) is a valuable model to use with health professionals to enhance their well-being.
  • Atherly Appointment Highlighted in Vermont Business Magazine as first Director of Health Services Research
    On September 26, 2017 Vermont Business Magazine highlighted the appointment of Adam Atherly, Ph.D., as the first Director of Health Services Research at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine.
  • Atherly Appointed Director of Health Services Research Center
    The Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont has announced the appointment of Adam Atherly, Ph.D., as the College’s first director of the health services research center and professor of medicine, effective February 1, 2018.
  • Higgins Study Examines Potential of Nicotine Reduction to Curb Smoking Addiction
    The FDA is right – when it comes to disease culprits, cigarette smoking tops the list. While recognized as the number-one cause of preventable disease and death, it’s an incredibly tough habit to break due to the addictiveness of nicotine. New research from the University of Vermont (UVM) and colleagues suggests that reducing nicotine content in cigarettes may decrease their addiction potential in especially vulnerable populations and suggests how regulatory policies could shift preferences to less-harmful tobacco products.