Medical Research Excellence

Research funding at the Larner College of Medicine has increased 300 percent in the last decade, to more than $82 million annually. Today, researchers in laboratory, clinical and community settings work to bring greater understanding of disease and wellness, and new, more effective treatments in key areas such as:

  • Cancer Research
  • Cardiovascular Research
  • Health Services Research and Education, Outcomes Research, and Quality Improvement
  • Immunobiology & Infectious Disease Research
  • Metabolic Research
  • Neuroscience Research
  • Pulmonary Research

Learn more about our research programs >>


Meet our Scientists

krementsov_150x150Meet a Scientist: Dimitry Krementsov, Ph.D.

Think of the immune system as the shepherd, and bacteria as the sheep, says Dimitry Krementsov, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Immunobiology at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont. Since it’s “constantly monitoring,” the immune system is the authority on what in the body could be harmful or benign, including the millions upon millions of bacteria that live in the gut.
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NEW! Internal Funding Opportunities

A new pilot research funding opportunity targeting health services research is now available, with a maximum of two $50,000 grants awarded. The application deadline is May 1, 2017. 
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Recent News


Novel Dimensional Approach Uncovers Biomarker for Inattention

Albaugh150x150Despite diagnoses for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) occurring in a reported 11 percent of U.S. school-aged kids, clinicians still don’t fully understand the underlying causes of this common condition. Now a brain marker may be on the horizon, thanks to a new approach that provides evidence of a relationship between brain structure and dimensional measures of ADHD symptoms.
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Research Spotlight

  • Stressed Out Interferons Reveal Potential Key to Alternative Lupus Treatment
    February 10, 2017
    Only one new drug has become available over the past 50 years for the estimated 1.5 million Americans and five million-plus people worldwide suffering from lupus, but new research has identified a previously unknown mechanism involved in the immune response that could provide an alternative therapy target.
  • American Heart Month: Zakai Research Q&A on Populations Most at Risk for Vascular Disease
    February 3, 2017
    The following interview with Neil Zakai, M.D., M.Sc., associate professor of medicine at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, originally appeared on the Facebook page of the Thrombosis and Haemostasis journal and focused on his research publication, titled “D-dimer and the Risk of Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS),” which was pre-published online in December 2016. (Key: TH = Thrombosis and Haemostasis; NZ = Neil Zakai)