Service to Medicine and Community Award

Presented to alumni who have maintained a high standard of medical service and who have achieved an outstanding record of community service or assumed other significant responsibilities not directly related to medical practice.

2016 Service to Medicine and Community Award Recipients

Glicksman_100x160_000Roslynn S. Glicksman, M.D. '81
Medical Director for Primary Care, Project Renewal Inc., New York, NY

Dr. Glicksman’s entire career has focused on improving health care for underserved population. In her almost eight years at Project Renewal, a New York City-based non-profit organization, Dr. Glicksman has expanded the project’s services for homeless patients, offering treatment through three mobile medical vans and one mobile mammography van in addition to care in six shelter-based facilities. She has also implemented many quality improvement initiatives and expanded access to specialty care. In 2015, she received the Philip W. Brickner National Leadership Award from the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council.

McQueen_Kelly_100x160_000K A Kelly McQueen, M.D. '91, M.P.H.
Professor, Department of Anesthesiology
Professor, Department of Surgery
Director, Vanderbilt Anesthesia Global Health & Development
Director, Vanderbilt Global Anesthesia Fellowship
Affiliate Faculty, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

Dr. McQueen is a leader in the global anesthesia and surgery communities. The Global Surgical Consortium, the 501c3 charity she formed in 2010, provides accurate data on the global anesthesia and surgical unmet needs and workforce crises in low income countries. At the request of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, she is developing best practice standards of care for anesthesia delivery in humanitarian settings. Dr. McQueen serves as chair of the Committee on Global Humanitarian Outreach for the American Society of Anesthesiologists, and played a key leadership role for the Alliance for Surgery and Anesthesia Presence, a multidisciplinary professional society that has produced more than 30 peer reviewed articles in the last five years.

Millard_Peter_100x160_000Peter S. Millard, M.D. '81, Ph.D.
Medical Director of Seaport Community Health Center, Belfast, Maine.

Dr. Millard is a family physician and epidemiologist who has practiced medicine both in Maine and in Sub-Saharan Africa, where he cared for some of the neediest patients at ground zero of the AIDS epidemic. He and his wife, Emily, a UVM nursing graduate, recently returned from five years in Mozambique, where he taught epidemiology, directed the medical school teaching clinic, and conducted clinical research at the Catholic University of Mozambique in Beira. His current area of research is male circumcision to prevent female-to-male HIV transmission, and his team recently developed a new minimally invasive technique for voluntary male circumcision which they expect to facilitate the World Health Organization’s plan to circumcise 20 million men in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Wilk_Peter_100x160_000Peter D. Wilk, M.D. '76
Psychiatrist, Portland, Maine and Former Executive Director of Physicians for Social Responsibility

Dr. Wilk has been active for the past 30 years in public health advocacy organizations and medical organizations concerned with preventing nuclear war, moderating climate change, reducing pollution, and phasing out nuclear reactors. In 2009, he was named executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility, after serving as a PSR board member for many years and as PSR’s president in 1995 and 2000. Dr. Wilk has also held leadership positions with International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, acting as the co-vice president for North America from 1996 to 2000 and Speaker of the International Council from 2004 to 2008.

2015 Service to Medicine and Community Award Recipients

Bolduc_Allyson 100x160Allyson M. Bolduc, M.D. '95

Dr. Bolduc has routinely delivered a high level of service to the UVM Department of Family Medicine and her community. She was integrally involved in collaborating with the Vermont Blueprint for Health; she has obtained a grant to do research in ovarian cancer, and directed and grew the important Family Medicine Review Course for several years. Dr. Bolduc has served on numerous committees including Quality, Search Committees, CME, Faculty Senate, and the Postgraduate Medical Education committee. Most recently she moved to state-wide delegate work through the Vermont Medical Society and has just finished a two-year term as the President of the Vermont Academy of Family Physicians, during which she was the VTAFP delegate to the American Academy of Family Physicians. Under her leadership, the VTAFP flourished by becoming more academic, more involved with advocacy, and more supportive of multiple important health initiatives statewide including universal lead screening, improving transitions of care to adult providers and ensuring access to Primary Care. Above and beyond her extensive faculty activity, Dr. Bolduc has done impressive community service as a Board member for the Lund Home, First Night Burlington, and the United Way.

Dicker_Rochelle 100x160Rochelle A. Dicker, M.D. '95

Dr. Dicker is a distinguished leader in the field of trauma surgery and violence prevention. She is known nationally and internationally for her work in the complex care of trauma patients, public health, and advocating for the underserved. Ten years ago, Dr. Dicker founded the Wraparound Project, a program designed to shut the revolving door of violent injury by providing culturally competent case management beginning at the bedside, shepherding clients to risk reduction resources, and providing long-term follow up. The injury recidivism rate has fallen from 16% to 4% in San Francisco. Dr. Dicker and her team are helping to build a network of hospital based violence prevention programs around the country. When praised for her efforts, Dr. Dicker always points to the team around her, many of whom are past victims of interpersonal violence who have joined her efforts at bettering their community. Recognized as a true public servant by her community, she was named one of the “Annual Heroes” by the San Francisco General Hospital Foundation in 2013, and received the UCSF Chancellor’s Award for Public Service. Dr. Dicker is a Co-Director of the Center for Global Surgical Studies at UCSF which focuses on research and education for capacity building with partners in low and middle income countries to address the burden of injury and surgical disease globally. She is an active educator in UCSF medical school and residency programs and mentor for those fortunate enough to work alongside her.

Durham Bull 100x160John W. Durham, M.D. '85

Chosen for his outstanding record of community-oriented medical service, Dr. John “Bull” Durham is a testament to how compassion for others can truly make a difference in the world. Dr. Durham is a board certified orthopaedic hand surgeon, with specialized training in trauma and fracture care and reconstructive techniques of the upper and lower extremities. Regarded highly by his peers for his knowledge, expertise and positive outcomes; his true skill lies in the care and compassion he provides patients from throughout Northern Arizona. Compassion is what influenced Dr. Durham’s quest to improve lives outside of Arizona too. After the 2010 Haitian earthquake, Dr. Durham felt a burning desire to help those affected by the destruction. A true pioneer in the efforts, Dr. Durham was among the first medical crews to arrive in Haiti after the disaster and was shocked by the devastation and suffering; and by how ill-equipped Haiti’s few hospitals were to treat even the most basic injuries. That first trip spawned 16 additional trips focused on facilitating medical care, implementing hospital infrastructure and supporting the orphanages that swelled after the quake. Today, Dr. Durham leads efforts with Northern Arizona Volunteer Medical Corps, a medical volunteer group founded in 1995 to help those in need all over the world. It is the people of Haiti, however, who still hold a very dear place in Dr. Durham’s heart — so much so, he recently adopted a child left orphaned from the deadly event of 2010.

Long_Jack100x160Jack G. Long, M.D. '75

In 1983 Dr. Long was introduced to Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in Haiti. Subsequently, he and his wife, Delight Wing, volunteered annually to work on the in- and out-patient pediatric service. In 2012, after over 32 years in pediatric practice in Vermont, they “retired” to work in Haiti with Partners in Health and their sister organization, Zanmi Lasante, in the Central Plateau of Haiti. As “accompagnateurs” they work with their Haitian colleagues to improve pediatric care at 11 clinical sites in the region. They provide direct care and support efforts to improve longitudinal programs such as malnutrition, HIV, neonatology and chronic diseases. With the recent opening of a new 300 bed teaching hospital they have been engaged with the development of a pediatric residency program.

Wing_Delight100x160Delight A. Wing, M.D. '75

With her husband, Jack Long, Dr. Wing spent her career as a general pediatrician in a practice in South Burlington, Vermont. As a member of the part-time UVM medical faculty she had the opportunity to work with medical students and pediatric residents, including serving, along with her husband, as UVM advisor for the New Hampshire-Vermont Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. In the medical community, Dr. Wing enjoyed a long partnership in many advisory roles with the Division of Family and Children’s Services VNA of Chittenden and Grand Isle Counties. In 1983, inspired by College of Medicine faculty members Charles Houston, M.D., and Renée Bergner, M.D., Dr. Wing and her husband began a 30-year relationship with the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles, Haiti. In 2012, they retired from their practice in Vermont to devote more time to practice and teach in Haiti, where they work with Partners in Health and its Haitian partner institution, Zanmi Lasante, spending six months a year accompanying colleagues at the new University Hospital of Mirebalais and 10 other sites co-administered with the Haitian Ministry of Health.

2014 Service to Medicine and Community Award Recipients

Koplewitz_Martin100x160Martin J. Koplewitz, M.D. '52

Dr. Koplewitz graduated from the University of Vermont College of Medicine cum laude in 1952 and was a charter member of the (AOA) Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Following a rotating internship at Beth Israel Hospital in New York he entered military service. He served at Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington, for two years as Officer in Charge of the Surgical Wards and Acting Chief of the Surgical Service. He subsequently returned to Vermont, where he finished his surgical residency in 1959. After private practice in surgery in St. Albans, Vermont, and in partnership with one of his mentors, Arthur Gladstone, M.D., Chief of Surgery at the DeGoesbriand Hospital, he joined the faculty of the University of Vermont in April of 1973 and was rapidly promoted to Associate Professor with tenure.  Dr. Koplewitz quickly became an exemplary role model for students and residents alike during his more than three decades of clinical teaching.  The compassionate way he cared for his patients and colleagues is considered legendary. 

Upton_Michael100x160Michael D. Upton, M.D. '94

Celebrating his 20th reunion, Dr. Michael Upton completed his psychiatric residency at Dartmouth and returned to Burlington to begin his psychiatric practice in 1998. A native Vermonter, his family includes four generations of UVM College of Medicine graduates dating back to the 1890s.  Currently, Dr. Upton is a CAPS (Counseling and Psychiatry Services) staff Psychiatrist who has worked at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at UVM since 2004. His clinical interests include diagnostic evaluation, medication management and brief psychotherapy models. He has worked in a number of settings including inpatient psychiatry, substance abuse treatment centers and community mental health. For over ten years Dr. Upton has been a faculty member on the college’s student wellness committee-a confidential peer support system for medical students.  Dr. Upton is a co-faculty advisor of the GSA (Gay-Straight Alliance) at the College of Medicine who has been a valued team member helping to guide this group.  Pamela Gibson, M.D. ’89, Dr. Upton’s co-faculty advisor on the GSA describes Dr. Upton as  “a compassionate listener who seeks to improve the visibility and acceptance for all underrepresented in the medical community including students, faculty, staff and patients.”  His approach, says Gibson, “is thoughtful and inclusive.”