Medical Research Excellence

Research funding at the Larner College of Medicine has increased 300 percent in the last decade, to more than $82 million annually. Today, researchers in laboratory, clinical and community settings work to bring greater understanding of disease and wellness, and new, more effective treatments in key areas such as:

  • Cancer Research
  • Cardiovascular Research
  • Health Services Research and Education, Outcomes Research, and Quality Improvement
  • Immunobiology & Infectious Disease Research
  • Metabolic Research
  • Neuroscience Research
  • Pulmonary Research

Learn more about our research programs >>


Meet our Scientists

20170419_mullen_02Meet a Scientist: Patrick Mullen

Cells grown in a petri dish behave differently than cells that reside in a human being or animal. In order to help bridge the divide between these two worlds and gain a better understanding of what causes disease, Patrick Mullen works in both, comparing results he sees in the lab of Christopher Francklyn, Ph.D., an expert in protein synthesis enzymes, with animal studies conducted in the lab of Alicia Ebert, Ph.D., a biology professor known for her work with zebrafish. Read more >>

Internal Funding Opportunities

A new pilot research funding opportunity targeting health services research is now available, with a maximum of two $50,000 grants awarded. Fall application deadline is TBD. 
LEARN MORE >> 


Recent News


UVM-Based Biomedical Entrepreneurship Course and Public Seminar Series Launches June 16

MercedesRinconI-TREP – a University of Vermont-based biomedical entrepreneurship training program – is sponsoring an intensive summer course that will take place at the Larner College of Medicine at UVM June 16 to 23, 2017. This unique course blends medicine, business, and innovation using a team-based learning format and covers topics in ethics, planning, funding, patents, venture capital, and start-ups. Read more >>


Research Spotlight

  • Higgins Study Examines Potential of Nicotine Reduction to Curb Smoking Addiction
    August 23, 2017
    The FDA is right – when it comes to disease culprits, cigarette smoking tops the list. While recognized as the number-one cause of preventable disease and death, it’s an incredibly tough habit to break due to the addictiveness of nicotine. New research from the University of Vermont (UVM) and colleagues suggests that reducing nicotine content in cigarettes may decrease their addiction potential in especially vulnerable populations and suggests how regulatory policies could shift preferences to less-harmful tobacco products.