Descriptions adapted from UVM Course Catalogue. For print versions (PDF files) of current course catalogues, please visit UVM's online course catalogue.

To view the current class schedule (or archived class schedules) please visit the Office of the Registrar.

Courses for Undergraduate Students

ANPS 19-20. Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology (4 Credits Each). ANPS 019 Offered Summer Semester/Fall Semester; ANPS 020 Offered Spring Semester/Summer Semester.
Two-semester lecture course with credit given upon completion of each semester. Structure and function of human body with be presented in a three lecture/week format with an additional online lab component. Completion of additional self-study units will be required. Required of all PRNU, DIET, NFS, PE, ME, RADT, NMT, MLS, AT, EXMS, and BSCI students; others with Instructor permission. Prerequisite: ANPS 019 for ANPS 020.

ANNB 201. Human Gross Anatomy (6 Credits). Offered Summer Semester.
Lectures and detailed regional dissections emphasize functional anatomy of major systems (e.g. musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous). Required of Physical Therapy students; others with Department permission.

NSCI 222. Cellular Neurophysiology (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester.
This is offered as both an undergraduate and graduate course designed to introduce the fundamentals of cellular neurophysiology through lecture, independent student reading and faculty-led group discussions of journal articles. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 225. Human Neuroanatomy (6 Credits). Offered Spring Semester.
Functional anatomy of the human nervous system and its cells. Focus on both peripheral and central nervous system. Lectures and laboratory (gross and microscopic anatomy). Prerequisites: Grad standing or BIOL 1 & 2, or BCOR 11 and 12, or ANPS 19 & 20, or an equivalent course sequence.

NSCI 280, Section A. Glia: Not Just Neuron Glue! (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester 2019.
This interdisciplinary course, taught by both researchers and clinicians, highlights recent research on the molecular mechanisms by which glial cells contribute to the establishment and progression of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In order to put a face and life story to these disorders, patient-physician panels will discuss the patient's symptoms, treatments, and disease impact on their lives.

NSCI 295B Complex Network Systems (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester.
This course will introduce complex network theory though applications to real biological data. We will discuss the evolution and function of biological networks at multiple spatial scales, from molecules to the human brain. We will learn how the evolution of biological networks converges on universal patterns, and we will discuss what can go awry in networks to cause diseases. This is offered as both an undergraduate and graduate course. 

Courses for Graduate Students

NSCI 280, Section B. Glia: Not Just Neuron Glue! (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester 2019.
This interdisciplinary course, taught by both researchers and clinicians, highlights recent research on the molecular mechanisms by which glial cells contribute to the establishment and progression of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Graduate students will work with the course director to prepare a didactic lecture, including developing lecture handouts and writing multiple-choice exam questions, and will present the lecture to students.

NSCI 302. Neuroscience (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester.
Functional anatomy of the human nervous system. Lectures and laboratory providing learning experience with dissected specimens, gross and microscopic anatomy. Incorporates clinical information from physician-scientists. Required of Physical Therapy students; others with departmental permission.

NSCI 306. Techniques in Neurobiology (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester.
Discussion of techniques used to study the nervous system. Experience with light, fluorescence, electron microscopy; microsurgical procedures; electrophysiological stimulating, recording techniques; neuronal tracing techniques. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 320. Developmental Neurobiology (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester 2017 (Offered Alternate Years).
Provides fundamental knowledge of cell-to-cell interactions necessary for proper development and organization of the nervous system. Topics include pattern formation, neuronal differentiation, axon guidance, and target interactions. Course Syllabus. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 323. Neurochemistry (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester 2016 (Offered Alternate Years).
Biochemistry of the nervous system. Topics include ion channels, synaptic function, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, signal transduction, and hormones in brain function. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 326. Basic Science of Neurologic Disease (3 Credits). Not Currently Offered.
In-depth examination of basic mechanisms and clinical aspects of a related subset of neurological disorders, e.g., neurodegenerative disease or disorders of neurotransmission. Disease group changes every year. Prerequisite: Advanced Graduate Students, Neuroscience Faculty and Residents in Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychology.

NSCI 327. Responsible Conduct in Biomedical Research (1 Credit). Offered Spring Semester.
Topics in Scientific Integrity surrounding responsible conduct and practices in biomedical research. Prerequisites: Advanced Graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and assistant professors in the biological or biomedical sciences. 

NSCI 328. Techniques in Microscopy (3 Credits). Offered Fall Semester.
Topics shall include practical background in microscopy, including brightfield, epifluorescence, confocal, multi-photon, deconvolution, atomic force and electron microscopy. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 329. Cellular & Molecular Neurophysiology (2 Credits). Offered Spring Semester 2017.
In this course we will discuss in detail, on both the cellular and molecular level, the physiological properties of cells within the nervous system. We will focus not only on the specific details of neuronal physiology, but also on the scientist, hypothesis, and experimental paradigm that validated the foundational ideas and concepts of this field. The goal of this course is thus two fold; first to study in detail the intricate details of how neurons work, and second to develop the intellectual skills necessary to develop and test new scientific hypotheses. 

NSCI 330. Comparative Neurobiology (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester 2018 (Offered Alternate Years).
Examination of the cellular mechanisms that underlie selective motor and sensory abilities, and unique behaviors that have evolved in various species. Discussion and student presentations. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 381-382. Seminar in Neuroscience (1 Credit). NSCI 381 Offered Fall Semester; NSCI 382 Offered Spring Semester.
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Research presentations and critical review of the literature in various areas of anatomical and neurobiological sciences. Prerequisite: Neuroscience majors; grad students only.

NSCI 395A. Cellular Neurophysiology (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester (Offered Alternate Years).
This is offered as both an undergraduate and graduate course designed to introduce the fundamentals of cellular neurophysiology through lecture, independent student reading and faculty-led group discussions of journal articles. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NSCI 395B Complex Network Systems (3 Credits). Offered Spring Semester.
This course will introduce complex network theory though applications to real biological data. We will discuss the evolution and function of biological networks at multiple spatial scales, from molecules to the human brain. We will learn how the evolution of biological networks converges on universal patterns, and we will discuss what can go awry in networks to cause diseases. This is offered as both an undergraduate and graduate course.