Vermont Medicine magazine features stories about students, faculty, and the alumni of the Larner College of Medicine and its engagement with the wider community.

FEATURED STORIES
Polio: A Memoir
Polio: A Memoir

My summer at Lake Dunmore abruptly ended late one afternoon in early- to mid-July. I suddenly felt extremely weak and had to sit down by a big oak tree next to our camp. It felt like “electricity” going through my body. I could not make it inside. That was very frightening. The next thing I remember is being in a dimly lit room lying in a fetal position. I was in Mary Fletcher Hospital, in Burlington, 42 miles away, and must have been having a spinal tap. I remember nothing of the next few days. In fact, there is much about my hospital stay I do not remember. Fortunately I have letters Mother wrote to Father covering my ten-week stay in the hospital.  >> READ MORE



The Science of Learning in Action
The Science of Learning in Action

The UVM Larner College of Medicine has a long history of leadership in medical education, from its 1967 curriculum redesign, which introduced earlier and more extensive clinical instruction and enhanced emphasis on lifelong learning, to the launch of the Vermont Integrated Curriculum (VIC) in 2003, which brought education in the basic sciences together with the health sciences and clinical skills in innovative ways. Now, the College has once again taken the lead in developing a new paradigm for medical education.>> READ MORE


Dynamic Duos
Dynamic Duos

Picture, if you will, a cancer cell. Alone, it is just a harmless anomaly. But free to divide exponentially, the cells explode to take over an organ. There's nothing like cancer to show the sheer power of multiplication. Now imagine that instead of cancer cells, you have two UVM Cancer Center members, a basic researcher and a clinician, each working away in their own areas. The two decide to collaborate, combining the researcher’s lab work and the physician’s knowledge of the patient care dimension of the disease. >> READ MORE


Jackson J.W. Clemmons, Ph.D., M.D.
A Pioneer in the Lab, and on the Land

In 1962, when Jackson J. W. Clemmons, Ph.D., M.D., moved to Vermont to join the UVM Department of Pathology, he was only the second African American on the College of Medicine faculty, and the first to stay for any length of time. Early on, a large farmhouse for sale in the town of Charlotte caught his eye. Public transportation stopped at Shelburne so, according to his daughter, Lydia Clemmons, the doctor walked the remaining six miles down a dirt road to reach the property. Locals called it the “white elephant house,” but Dr. Clemmons’ childhood experience apprenticing with his grandfather, a master carpenter, helped him see the possibilities beneath its surface.>> READ MORE