Patient Research Opportunities

Shared Mechanisms in Child Dysregulation, Adult Psychopathology, and Metabolic Disorders

This is a research study under the direction of Dr. Robert Althoff, M.D., Ph.D., Primary Investigator. The goal of this research is to understand why some children have broad problems with self-regulation (problems with regulating emotions, behavior, and cognition) and to develop interventions to prevent poor adult outcomes. The eventual goal of this research is to develop interventions to prevent self-regulation problems in childhood from progressing to metabolic problems (like diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol) in adulthood.
This study involves filling out a series of questionnaires as well as participating in

  1. a structured interview for parent and child (which will be audio-recorded)
  2. a semi-structured interview for parent (which will be audio-recorded)
  3. heart rate and eye movement monitoring during a computer based task
  4. a brief intelligence test for the child
  5. a series of other computer-based tasks
  6. saliva sample from parent and child
  7. blood sample from parent and child
  8. body measurements (height, weight, abdominal circumference) for parent and child
Recruitment

All families who are referred to the Center for Children, Youth and Families for a child psychiatric evaluation are being asked to participate.  Our goal is to enroll 100 referred children and either two parents or one parent and a sibling.

Please email Merelise Ametti or call 656-2266 for more information.

Child Behavior Checklist-Dysregulation Profile: Genes, Environment, & Life Course

This is a research study under the direction of Dr. Robert Althoff, M.D., Ph.D., Primary Investigator. We recruit from within the Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families. This study adds an additional layer of assessment and psychophysiological measurement for children who meet the entry criteria.

1) Emotional Regulation Study

This study of emotion regulation in children ages 8-12 includes study visits in two 2-5 hour sessions or one 5 hour session in the Child Psychiatry Department at UHC. Appointments can be made at times that are convenient for your family. Compensation is $50 per family. A questionnaire about your child's behavior and functioning will be sent to you to determine if your family is eligible for this study.

Study visits include:

  • Semi-structured interview with parent(s)/guardian(s) and child
  • Structured interview with parent(s)/guardian(s)
  • On-line questionnaires for parent(s)/guardian(s) and child
  • Eye tracking tasks and heart rate monitoring with child
  • DNA sample by spitting into a cup parent(s)/guardian(s) and child

Please email Eileen Crehan or call 656-2126 for more information.

2) Stare-In-The-Crowd Effect: Eye Tracking and Physiological Response

Study visits are studied in 2-5 hour sessions in the Child Psychiatry Department at UHC and include:
•Heart rate and galvanic skin response (GSR) over the course of these visits
•Two screenings; one for autism spectrum disorder and one for social anxiety

Please email Eileen Crehan or call 656-2126 for more information.

3) Multi-family Group Psychoeducational Psychotherapy for Dysregulation

Participants will be 20 children and adolescents ages 8-13 and their parents recruited from the Pediatric Psychiatry Clinic (PPC) at the Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families (VCCYF). Children and their families seeking evaluation and treatment at the VCCYF and the PPC are routinely offered the opportunity to participate in research studies.

  • 5-hour assessment of the children and parents, those families will be offered the opportunity to participate in this study.

The children who assent and their parents or guardians who consent to the study:

  • Families will participate in a once weekly, 90 minute group psychotherapy using the Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy program (MF-PEP).
  • 1 session per week for 8 weeks.

Contact Sarah Guth for more information regarding this study.

These research studies are funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH).

JimHudziak1_001RobAlthoff_000
James Hudziak, MD, and
Robert Althoff, PhD, MD