Larner Faculty Volunteer to Create Clinic at Sugarbush

March 25, 2022 by Janet Essman Franz

A new, non-profit medical clinic at Sugarbush Resort — Three Peaks Medical Clinic — is scheduled to open in December 2022 and be staffed by UVM Division of Emergency Medicine faculty member volunteers. The clinic's mission is to provide the resort area community access to on-mountain medical care and provide a venue for facilitating wilderness, emergency, and sports medicine research.

The current clinic building at Sugarbush Resort. (Photo courtesy of Sugarbush Resort)

A new medical clinic at Sugarbush Resort — Three Peaks Medical Clinic — is scheduled to open in December 2022. The clinic will function as a non-profit with a mission to provide the resort area community access to on-mountain medical care and will provide a venue for facilitating wilderness, emergency, and sports medicine research. UVM Division of Emergency Medicine faculty members who will volunteer at the clinic include Wilderness Medicine Program Director Sarah Schlein, M.D., Ellen Stein, M.D. M.B.A., J. Ship, M.D., Katherine Dolbec, M.D., and Mark Bisanzo, M.D. Nathan Endres, M.D., associate professor of orthopaedics and member of the U.S Ski Team physician pool, will also volunteer.

The primary goal of the facility will be to evaluate and treat on-hill injuries as well as basic walk-in primary care for resort guests and community members. Patients will not be charged for medical care provided by the doctors and will pay only for services such as x-rays. Donations will be accepted for assessment and evaluation of illness or injury.

A fundraising campaign is underway, with a goal is to raise $250,000 to purchase medical equipment and support initial operating costs. Sugarbush is providing the space rent-free, which will allow the clinic to keep annual operating costs minimal. 

Sugarbush hosted a former medical clinic at Lincoln Peak for 48 years in collaboration with the University of Vermont Medical Center (UVMMC). Founded by Robert Johnson, M.D., professor emeritus of orthopaedics and rehabilitation, the former clinic treated 300-500 patients a year, easing the burden on hospital emergency rooms and providing immediate on-mountain care during hours when most local facilities were closed. It also provided opportunities for Johnson and colleagues to collect comprehensive data on skiing and snowboarding injuries, informing some of the most groundbreaking research on snow sports injuries and prevention in the world. The former clinic closed in 2019.

As an orthopaedic resident at UVMMC, Endres enjoyed a rotation at the former clinic. 

"We worked side-by-side with great teachers like Bob Johnson and other faculty. It was very rewarding and a fantastic educational opportunity," Endres said. "I'm excited that there will be a new iteration of the clinic, and to continue the rich legacy of Dr. Johnson's research."

Learn more about how to contribute to this initiative.

Larner Snapshot Cover Image 2022

Voices of the College

“…Being an excellent doctor does not just require the knowledge of medical phenomena and practice of intricate procedures, it requires empathy. It requires us to listen to patients, connect with them, meet them where they are, and work with them in their treatment.” – 

Read the full blog post.

Chellie NayerChellie Nayar'25

 

Events


We foster brilliant teachers, who educate talented students, who become the caring, knowledgeable physicians and scientists of tomorrow.


Popular Links