Research News

  • Larner Holds 2021 Excellence in Research Celebration Oct. 25-27
    The Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont is holding the 2021 Dean’s Excellence in Research Celebration Monday, October 25 to Wednesday, October 27. The event will take place virtually via Zoom.
  • College Celebrates Firestone Building at Ceremonial Groundbreaking
    The University of Vermont and Larner College of Medicine hosted a ceremonial groundbreaking to celebrate the four-story, 62,500-square-foot Firestone Medical Research Building currently under construction at the College of Medicine on September 30, 2021.
  • Kolb Receives NCI Grant to Develop Treatment for Chemo-Induced Nerve Damage
    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Noah Kolb, M.D., associate professor of neurological sciences at the University of Vermont's Larner College Medicine, and a team of researchers a $7 million grant to a develop a new intervention for chemo-induced neuropathy, one that can be as easily implemented in rural areas as large urban centers.
  • Heil's Study Tests Co-location of Contraceptive Services with Opioid Treatment Programs
    More than 75% of women with Opioid Use Disorder report having had an unintended pregnancy, but they are less likely to use effective contraception compared to women who do not use drugs. Results from a multi-year trial led by UVM Professor Sarah Heil found that a two-part intervention featuring co-located contraceptive services in opioid treatment programs and financial incentives could offer an effective solution.
  • Research Team Uncovers Unexplored Universe of Calcium Signals in the Brain
    UVM and University of Maryland researchers have shown how the brain communicates to blood vessels when in need of energy, and how these blood vessels respond to direct blood flow to specific brain regions -- information that can help determine what goes wrong in conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, where faulty blood flow is a predictor for cognitive impairment.
  • Cushman & Colleagues' Study Shows Benefits of Early Anticlotting Therapy in Moderate COVID-19
    New trial results from the University of Vermont and an international team of researchers show that administering a full dose of a standard blood thinner early to moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19 could reduce the risk of severe disease and death.
  • UVM Hosts 9th Biennial Stem Cells Conference
    Investigators from across the globe came together virtually July 12-15, 2021 for the University of Vermont-hosted ninth biennial "Stem Cells, Cell Therapies, and Bioengineering in Lung Biology" conference to share the latest research in the field and set priorities for their work in the future.
  • Clarfeld & Gramling's Study Describes Tool for Improving Serious Illness Conversations
    Understanding what happens during important conversations between seriously ill people, their families and palliative care specialists – and how they vary by cultural, clinical, and situational contexts – is essential to guide healthcare communication improvement efforts. A new computer model developed by a team of UVM researchers offers an automated and valid tool for conducting large-scale scientific analyses of these conversations.
  • Chaarani & Colleagues Publish Largest-ever Pre-Adolescent Brain Activation Study Findings
    UVM scientists and colleagues published youth brain activation data from the largest longitudinal neuroimaging study to date in Nature Neuroscience. The findings provide valuable new information on the cognitive processes and brain systems that underlie adolescent development and might contribute to mental and physical health challenges in adulthood.
  • Diehl & Colleagues' Latest Research Could Benefit Dengue Vaccine Development
    Despite a record number of over 400 million cases in 2019, vaccine development for the mosquito-borne dengue virus has been challenging due to the need to protect equally against all four dengue strains. The discovery of new possible biomarkers to predict clinical and immune responses to dengue virus infection could be critical to informing future vaccines.