Opening the mysteries of drug actions, discovering new therapies, and developing new medicinal products

Cardiovascular regulation, cell signaling, structural and cancer biology, and environmental toxicology are just a few interests of the faculty at the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Vermont.

Students interested in the interaction of chemical substance with biological systems will benefit from direct contact with faculty researchers. Studies in Pharmacology at the College of Medicine serve medical and graduate students, post-doctoral trainees and undergraduates.

Learn more about Pharmacology as a Career sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET).

Learn more about careers for scientists from the Science Careers Site sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Faculty Search

The Pharmacology Department is currently looking for a new faculty member.  Apply here.

 


Graduate students and poster

Graduate Studies

The Pharmacology Department has joined the Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program for those Graduates interested in pursuing a Ph.D. The Pharmacology Department offers both a Thesis Research based Masters in Pharmacology and a Non-Thesis Masters  in Pharmacology. Exclusively for UVM students we offer an Accelerated Masters Program. We also offer an undergraduate 15-credit minor, course offerings include Toxicology, Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Pharmacological Techniques and Medicinal Chemistry.

Researcher in a lab

Pharmacology Research

  • Brain and cerebral vascular studying the blood flow to the brain.
  • Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Physiology
  • Signal transduction
  • Medicinal chemistry/cancer chemotherapy

Faculty giving presentation

Seminars and Research Forums

As the host of the weekly Seminar Series and the annual trustees visit and retreat, the Pharmacology department has an active schedule of seminars and events.

The Pharmacology Department hosts Research Forums monthly to encourage collaboration. Presentations are made by faculty and postdocs.

Recent News

Nelson’s Research Leadership Garners NHLBI Outstanding Investigator Award

February 4, 2019 by Jennifer Nachbur

University of Vermont (UVM) Distinguished Professor and Chair of Pharmacology Mark Nelson, Ph.D., has been awarded a prestigious $6.45 million dollar Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA) from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the National Institutes of Health. The award will provide support for Nelson’s research program, titled “Capillaries as a Sensory Web that Controls Cerebral Blood Flow in Health and Disease,” for seven years.

Mark Nelson, Ph.D., UVM Professor and Chair of Pharmacology (Photo: UVM Medical Communications)

University of Vermont (UVM) Distinguished Professor and Chair of Pharmacology Mark Nelson, Ph.D., has been awarded a prestigious $6.45 million dollar Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA) from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the National Institutes of Health.

The award will provide support for Nelson’s research program, titled “Capillaries as a Sensory Web that Controls Cerebral Blood Flow in Health and Disease,” for seven years.

Local blood flow is critical to supply neurons in the brain with a continuous supply of nutrients, but despite extensive study, the mechanisms underlying the functional linkage between the energy needs of the brain’s neurons and blood flow in the brain remain poorly understood. Nelson and his colleagues have made great strides in uncovering critical information about this process, including the discovery that capillaries actively control blood flow by acting like a series of wires, transmitting electrical signals to direct blood to the areas that need it most. With this funding, Nelson and his colleagues will advance this work, and determine new insights into small vessel disease of the brain – a leading cause of cognitive decline and functional loss in elderly patients.

A member of the UVM faculty since 1986, Nelson is internationally recognized for his vascular research. An NIH MERIT award recipient, he is a Fellow of both the American Heart Association and the Biophysical Society and was a regular member of the National Institutes of Health’s Pharmacology Study Section. His extensive research contributions have been recognized with more than 360 invited lectureships since 2000, including the Paul M. Vanhoutte Lectureship in Vascular Pharmacology by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. In addition, he is the recipient of the Annual Reviews Award for Scientific Reviewing from the American Physiological Society, and University Scholar and University Distinguished Professor honors from UVM.

Designed to promote scientific productivity and innovation, the NHLBI OIA allows program directors/principal investigators to take greater risks and greater flexibility and freedom to conduct research that breaks new ground or extends previous discoveries in new directions. Eligible candidates must be experienced investigators currently leading at least two NHLBI R01-equivalent awards whose outstanding record of research demonstrates their ability to make major contributions to heart, lung, blood and sleep research.