Interfaith Calendar

Our community includes members from numerous backgrounds and we strive for awareness and understanding of a variety of cultural observances. This calendar is designed for informational purposes and may not include all major religious/cultural holidays and details of each. Due to variations in cultural and regional religious practices and the use of different calendars, some dates of holidays may vary from these listed below.

Per UVM policy, all members of the UVM Community are encouraged to be thoughtful about scheduling events such as guest lectures, meetings, symposiums, etc. on major religious holidays. Consideration of major religious holidays when developing events will support engagement and attendance. We appreciate your feedback. If you would like to make suggestions on additions to this calendar please contact us at meddiversity@med.uvm.edu.

 

 

August
Aug. 1, 2024

Aug. 1, 2025

Aug. 1, 2026

Aug. 1, 2027

Lammas /Lughnasadh (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

A celebration of the beginning of the harvest. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: Making and consuming dishes with the first fruits of the harvest.

Aug. 19, 2024

Aug. 8, 2025

Aug. 28, 2026

Aug. 17, 2027

Raksha Bandhan (Hindu)

The Rakhi festivity falls in the holy month of Shravan; The origin and history of Rakhi can be dated back to the mythological Pouranik times.

General Practices: A day to acknowledge siblings and their relationships.

 

June 16-17, 2024

June 6-7, 2025 (tentative)

May 26-27, 2026 (tentative)

May 16-17 2027 (tentative)

 

Eid al-Adha – Begins at Sundown (Islamic)

Holiday with significant work restriction

Eid al-Adha is a major festival that celebrates the willingness to make sacrifices in the name of one’s faith. According to legend, the prophet Ibrahim was ordered to sacrifice his son in God’s name. When Ibrahim was prepared to kill his son, God stepped in and gave him a sheep to sacrifice instead. This holiday celebrates Ibrahim’s total faith in God, and Muslims view this holiday as an important annual reminder.

General Practices: Prayers, gift giving, prayers, and sometimes slaughtering of sheep, with a portion of the meat gifted to the poor.

Date details: Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice. Begins at sundown.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on the first day. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (Islamic dietary restrictions apply).

Aug. 26-27, 2024

Aug. 15-16, 2025

Sept. 3-4, 2026

Aug. 25-26, 2027

Krishna Janmashtami (Hindu)

This festival celebrates the birth of Krishna, a widely-worshiped Hindu god. Krishna is considered to be a warrior, hero, teacher, and philosopher.

 

General Practices: During this festival, Hindus are likely to forgo sleep in order to sing bhajans, traditional Hindu songs. Many Hindus also fast during the first day of the festival. Dances, songs, and plays depicting the life of Krishna are common.

 

Date Details: The first day is called Krishan ashtami or Gokul ashtami. The second day is known as Kaal ashtami or more popularly Janam ashtami.

 

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling major academic deadlines on this day, since it is likely that students will be operating on very little sleep.

September

Oct. 2-4, 2024

Sep. 22-24, 2025

Sept. 11-13, 2026

Oct. 1-3, 2027

Rosh Hashanah - Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

Holiday with significant work restriction

Start of the Jewish New Year, day of judgment and remembrance; the Jewish calendar celebrates the New Year in the seventh month (Tishrei) as a day of rest and celebration ten days before Yom Kippur.

General practices: Prayer in synagogue and festive meals

Date details: Begins at sundown.

Recommended accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Sept. 21-29, 2024

Sept. 21-29, 2025

Sept. 21-29, 2026

Sept. 21-29, 2027

Mabon /Alban Elfed /Autumnal Equinox (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

Also referred to as Harvest Home, the Feast of the Ingathering, and Meán Fómhair. Mabon is the second celebration of the harvest, a ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth, and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: At Mabon, day and night are in equal balance. It is a time to offer gratitude for the blessings of the harvest and also to begin to prepare for turning inward. Making dishes with apples, squash and pumpkins as part of ritual celebration is customary.

Oct. 11-12, 2024

Oct. 1-2, 2025

Sept. 20-21, 2026

Oct. 10-11, 2027

Yom Kippur – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

Holiday with significant work restriction

Yom Kippur is often considered the holiest day of the year for Jews, and the day is dedicated to atonement and abstinence.

General Practices: During Yom Kippur, Jews fast from before sundown until after sunset, and light a Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the night of Yom Kippur.

Date details: Begins at sundown on the first evening listed and ends the second evening listed.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date and after a day of fasting.

October

Oct. 16-23, 2024

Oct. 6-13, 2025

Sept. 25-Oct 2, 2026

Oct. 15-22, 2027

Sukkot – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

Holiday with significant work restriction

An eight day or week-long celebration which begins with the building of Sukkah for sleep and meals; Sukkot is named for the huts Moses and the Israelites lived in as they wandered the desert before reaching the promised land.

General Practices: Families in the United States commonly decorate the sukkah with produce and artwork.

Date details: Begins the evening listed and involves resting the following two days, which may include a respite from classes.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on the first two days. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher basics).

Oct. 23-25, 2024

Oct. 13-15, 2025

Oct. 2-4, 2026

Oct. 22-24, 2027

 

Shemini Atzeret – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

Holiday with significant work restriction

 

Also known as Atzereth, this is a fall festival, which includes a memorial service for the dead and features prayers for rain in Israel.

General Practices: Jews light a Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on Shemini Atzereth (the 8th night of Sukkot).

Date details: Begins at sundown the first evening listed.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher basics).

Oct. 24-25, 2024

Oct. 14-15, 2025

Oct. 3-4, 2026

Oct. 23-24, 2027

Simchat Torah – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

Holiday with significant work restriction

Simchat Torah marks the completion of the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah in the synagogue and the beginning of the new cycle.

General Practices: Practitioners dance in synagogues as all the Torah scrolls are carried around in seven circuits.

Date details: Begins at sundown the first evening listed and through the following day.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this evening or the following day.

 

Oct. 2-12, 2024

Sept. 22-Oct. 2, 2025

Oct. 11-19, 2026

Sept. 30-Oct. 8, 2027


Navaratri (Hindu)

Navarati is one of the greatest Hindu festivals, and celebrates the triumph of good over evil. During this time, Hindus worship Durga, Lakshmi, and Saraswati.

General Practices: Durga is the mother goddess, and so Hindus try to visit their mothers and other relatives during this time. Some Hindus will pray and fast, and there are are often feasts and dances.

Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2024

Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2025
Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2026

Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2027

Samhain (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

One of the four “greater Sabbats” and considered by some to be the Wiccan New Year. A time to celebrate the lives of those who have passed on, welcome those born during the past year into the community, and reflecting on past relationships, events and other significant changes in life.

General Practices: Paying respect to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets and other loved ones who have died.

Nov. 1, 2024
Oct. 20, 2025

Nov. 6, 2026

Oct. 29, 2027

Diwali (Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jain)

Holiday with significant work restriction

Diwali—the Hindu “festival of lights”—is an extremely popular holiday for multiple religions throughout Southern Asia. Diwali extends over five days, and celebrates the victory of good over evil. The Times of India described Diwali as “a reaffirmation of hope, a renewed commitment to friendship and goodwill, and a religiously sanctioned celebration of the simple.” Fireworks, oil lamps, and sweets are common, making this a favorite holiday for children. The lamps are lit to help the goddess Lakshmi find her way into people’s homes.

General Practices: Lighting oil lamps and candles, setting off fireworks, and prayer.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Hindu employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

 

Nov. 2-3, 2024

Oct. 21-22, 2025

Birth of Bahá’u’lláh (Baha’i)

Holiday with significant work restriction

This holiday celebrates the birthday of Bahá’u’lláh, one of the Baha’I faith’s most important figures. For Bahá’ís, the Birth of Bahá’u’lláh is a Holy Day celebrating the rebirth of the world through the love of God, just as Christmas is for Christians.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. (Baha’i employees will likely request to have this day off.)

December

 

Dec. 25, 2024-Jan. 2, 2025

Dec. 14-22, 2025

Dec. 4-12, 2026

Dec. 24, 2027-Jan. 1, 2028

Hanukkah / Chanukah – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Hanukkah is the Jewish festival of lights, and lasts for eight days. Hanukkah commemorates the Jewish struggle for religious freedom. The history of the holiday involves a historic military victory in which a Jewish sect called the Maccabees defeated the Syrian Greeks. The celebration commemorates a miracle in which a sacred temple flame burned for eight days on only one day’s worth of oil.

General Practices: On each of the eight nights of Hanukkah, Jewish families light an additional candle of the menorah candelabrum until all eight candles are lit. Jews celebrate with food and song, as well as exchanging gifts for eight days.

Date details: Hanukkah begins at sundown on the first day.

Recommended Accommodations: Academics and work permitted, not a work holiday. Provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply—potato pancakes, doughnuts or other fried food is customary).

 

Dec. 21, 2024
Dec. 21, 2025

Dec. 21, 2026
Dec. 21, 2027

Yule/Midwinter/Alban Arthan/Winter Solstice (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

 

The longest night of the year followed by the sun’s “rebirth” and lengthening of days. In most traditions, Yule is celebrated as the rebirth of the Great God, who is viewed as the newborn solstice sun. Some pagans consider Yule to be the beginning of the new year. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: Burning the yule log (which was traditionally  part of last year’s yule tree) is an act of faith and renewal that, indeed, the light, and the warmth will return.

Dec. 24-25, 2024

Dec. 24-25, 2025

Dec. 24-25, 2026

Dec. 24-25, 2027

 

Christmas – Begins at Sundown (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Christmas is an annual celebration commemorating the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, the Messiah whose message and self-sacrifice began the Christian religion.

General Practices: Many celebrate this holiday by giving gifts, attending church services, decorating Christmas trees, and visiting family.

Date details: Begins at sundown on Dec. 24 annually and continues with all day celebration on Dec. 25.

Recommended Accommodations: This is a national holiday in the United States, so special accommodations are likely not required.

Dec. 26, 2023-Jan. 1, 2024
Dec. 26, 2024-Jan. 1, 2025
Dec. 26, 2025-Jan. 1, 2026
Dec. 26, 2026-Jan. 1, 2027

Kwanzaa 

As an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated by millions throughout the world African community, Kwanzaa brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense.

General Practices: During the holiday, families and communities organize activities around the Nguzo Saba (The Seven Principles): Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and lmani (Faith). Visit the official Kwanzaa website.

January

Jan. 1, 2024

Jan. 1, 2025
Jan. 1, 2026
Jan. 1, 2027

Gantan-sai (Shinto)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Gantan-sai is the annual New Year festival of the Shinto religion.

General Practices: Practitioners pray for inner renewal, prosperity, and health, as well as visiting shrines and visiting friends and family.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on this date (work holiday)

Jan. 6, 2024

Jan. 6, 2025
Jan. 6, 2026
Jan. 6, 2027

Epiphany/Twelfth Night/Three Kings Day (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

This date is also known as Befana Day; commemorates the revelation of God through Jesus Christ and marks the time the three wise men arrived in Bethlehem and presented gifts to the baby Jesus.

General Practices: Prayer, festive meals, offerings, gifts

Jan. 7, 2024

Jan. 7, 2025
Jan. 7, 2026
Jan. 7, 2027

Christmas (Eastern Orthodox Christian)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Christmas is an annual celebration commemorating the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, the Messiah whose message and self-sacrifice began the Christian religion.

General Practices: Many celebrate this holiday by attending church services, holding celebratory meals, and visiting family.

Date details: Eastern Orthodox Christmas is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

Recommended Accommodations: Because this holiday typically falls during winter break, academic accommodations may not be required. However many Eastern Orthodox employees will probably request this day off.

February

Feb. 1-2, 2024

Feb. 1-2, 2025
Feb. 1-2, 2026
Feb. 1-2, 2027

Imbolc/Candlemas (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

 

Also referred to as the Feast of Pan, Feast of Torches, Feast of Waxing Lights, and Oimele. Celebrates the coming of spring and recovery of the Earth Goddess after giving birth to the Sun God at Yule. For many traditions, a time for initiations, re-dedication and pledges for the coming year. One of the four “greater Sabbats.”

General Practices: Activities might include making candles, reading poetry and telling stories.

Feb. 3, 2024

Feb. 3, 2025

Feb. 3, 2026

Feb. 3, 2027

Setsubum-sai (Shinto)

 

Setsubum-sai marks the beginning of spring, and is known as the “bean-throwing festival. The faithful scatter roasted beans to bring good luck to the new season.

Feb. 10-24, 2024 (Dragon)

Jan. 29-Feb. 12, 2025 (Snake)

Feb. 17-March 3, 2026 (Horse)

Feb. 6-20, 2027 (Goat)

Chinese New Year (Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

This is the most important of traditional Chinese holidays.

General Practices: Families gather together to spend the evening preparing boiled dumplings and festive meals and giving of money to children in red envelopes.

Date details: Corresponds to the New Moon in Aquarius, which can fall from late January to mid-February

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Many Chinese employees will probably request this day off.

March

Feb. 14, 2024

March 5, 2025

Feb. 18, 2026

February 10, 2027

Ash Wednesday (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

This is the first day of Lent, the period of forty days before Easter in which many Christians sacrifice ordinary pleasures to reflect on Christ’s sacrifice.

General Practices: On this day, there are special church services, and the faithful wear a cross of ashes marked on foreheads. Most Christians abstain from meat on this day.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested—prohibitions include animal products.

Feb. 24, 2024

(no date in 2025)

Feb. 18, 2026

Feb. 10, 2027

Magha Puja Day (Buddhist)

 

Magha Puja Day commemorates an important event in the life of the Buddha, in which the four disciples traveled to join the Buddha.

March 23-24, 2024

March 13-14, 2025
March 2-3, 2026

March 22-24, 2027

Purim – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Purim commemorates the time when the Jews were living in Persia and were saved from genocide by the courage of a young Jewish woman called Esther.

General Practices: Many Jews hold carnival-like celebrations on Purim, dressing in costumes, and read the Book of Esther. Triangular, fruit-filled pastries are eaten in opposition to the villain Haman, who wore a three-cornered hat.

Date details: Begins at sundown the first evening listed.

Recommended Accommodations: Purim is not subject to the restrictions on work that affect some other holidays;  however, some sources indicate that Jews should not go about their ordinary business at Purim out of respect for the festival. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (kosher basics).

March 24, 2024

April 13, 2025
March 29, 2026

March 21, 2027

Palm Sunday (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant/Eastern Orthodox Christianity)

 

A commemoration of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as crowds lined his path with palm fronds

General Practices: Prayer, distribution of palm leaves commemorating Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem prior to his crucifixion.

March 19, 2024

March 20, 2025
March 21, 2026

March 21, 2027

Ostara/Alban Eilir/Spring Equinox (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

 

Also known as Eostre. Regarded as a time of fertility and conception. In some Wiccan traditions, it is marked as the time when the Goddess conceives the God’s child, which will be born at the winter solstice. One of eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: Lighting fires to commemorate the return of light in the spring and to honor the God and Goddess. Coloring eggs as a way of honoring fertility is also practiced.

March 20, 2024

March 20, 2025
March 20, 2026

March 20, 2027

Naw Ruz – Begins at Sundown (Baha’i)

 

This is the Baha’i New Year, a traditional celebration in Iran adopted as a holy day associated with Baha’i. It is a celebration of spring and new life.

General Practices: Festive music dancing, prayers, meetings, meals

March 24-25, 2024

March 13-14, 2025

March 3-4, 2026

March 22-23, 2027

Holi (Hindu)

 

Also known as the “Festival of Colors,” this holiday can be traced to Hindu scriptures commemorating good over evil. This date is also a celebration of the colorful spring and a farewell to the dull winter.

General Practices: Hindus often sprinkle colored water and powder on others and celebrate with bonfires and lights, signifying victory of good over evil.

Date details: Celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar moon in late February or early March.

April

March 28, 2024

April 17, 2025
April 2, 2026

March 25, 2027

Maundy Thursday (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

Thursday before Easter, commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles.

General Practices: Prayer, Communion (Eucharist), meals, and foot-washing ceremonies among some Christian denominations

Date details: Always falls on the Thursday before Easter Sunday.

March 29, 2024

April 18, 2025
April 3, 2026
March 26, 2027

Good Friday (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

Friday before Easter, commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ; among some sects of Christianity and in many countries marks a day of fasting.

General Practices: Prayer, fasting, and noon or afternoon services in some Christian denominations.

Date details: Always falls on the Friday before Easter Sunday.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested—meat (fish is not considered meat) is prohibited during meals for some.

March 31, 2024

April 20, 2025

April 5, 2026

March 28, 2027

 

Easter (Christian/Roman Catholic and Protestant)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Annual commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ

General Practices: Celebratory meals, family gatherings, distribution of colored eggs, baskets and chocolate bunnies. It is a celebration of renewal.

Date details: Easter Sunday is determined by the Gregorian calendar (Gregorian calendar regulates ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches).

April 13, 2024

April 14, 2025
April 14, 2026
April 14, 2027

Vaisakhi (Sikh)

 

Vaisakhi is the Sikh new year festival and commemorates 1699, the year Sikhism was born. Vaisakhi is also a long-established harvest festival.

General Practices: There are often parades, dancing, and singing throughout the day. These celebrations involve music, singing, and chanting of scriptures and hymns.

April 22-30, 2024

April 12-20, 2025

April 1-9, 2026

April 21-29, 2027

Pesach/Passover – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Pesach is a week-long observance commemorating the freedom and exodus of the Israelites (Jewish slaves) from Egypt during the reign of the Pharaoh Ramses II (one of three pilgrimage festivals).

General Practices: Family gatherings, ritualized meals called Seders, reading of the Haggadah, lighting of Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the last night of Passover.

Date details: Begins at sundown the first evening listed.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on the first evening, the following two days, or the last two days of the holiday, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply—the use of leavening is prohibited so, for example, matzah is eaten in place of bread.)

May 3, 2024

April 18, 2025

April 10, 2026

April 30, 2027

Holy Friday/Good Friday (Eastern Orthodox Christian)

 

Friday before Easter, commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ; among some sects of Christianity and in many countries marks a day of fasting.

General Practices: Prayer, fasting, confession, and church services as well as the wrapping or dying of eggs (often red) in preparation for Easter Sunday.

Date details: Orthodox Good Friday is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on the date.

May 5, 2024

April 20, 2025

April 12, 2026

May 2, 2027

Pascha/Easter (Eastern Orthodox Christian)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Annual commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ

General Practices: Celebratory meals, family gatherings, distribution of colored eggs and baskets of breads, meats, eggs, cheeses and other foods. It is a celebration of renewal.

Date details: Easter Sunday is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

May 5-6, 2024

April 23-24, 2025
April 13-14, 2026

May 3-4, 2027

Yom HaSho’ah – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Holocaust Remembrance Day; a day to remember the lives and names of Jewish relatives and friends.

General Practices: Ceremonies or events to remember Holocaust victims who died during World War II; activities may include lighting memorial candles and reciting the Kaddish, which is a prayer for the deceased.

Date details: Begins at sundown.

Recommended Accommodations: This is not a work holiday—academics and work are permitted. Provide food accommodation as requested (kosher basics).

May

May 1, 2024

May 1, 2025
May 1, 2026
May 1, 2027

Beltane (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

 

The fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: Jumping the balefire, dancing the MayPole.

May 22, 2024

May 11, 2025

May 1, 2026

May 2, 2027

 

Buddha Day/Visakha Puja (Buddhist)

 

This holiday is traditionally known as Buddha’s birthday. It is the major Buddhist festival, commemorating the birth, enlightenment, and death of the Buddha.

General Practices: Buddhists often decorate their homes and visit their local temples. Observers are encouraged to refrain from slaughtering and to avoid eating meat on this date.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested, and offer vegetarian options when planning menus for events on this date.

May 29, 2024

May 29, 2025
May 29, 2026

May 29, 2027

Ascension of the Baha’ullah (Baha’i)

 

Commemorates the death of the founder of the Baha’i faith; Baha’llah died on May 29, 1892.

General Practices: Devotional programs and reading from the scriptures

June 11-13, 2024

June 1-3, 2025
May 21-23, 2026

June 10-12, 2027

Shavuot – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Commemorates receipt of the Torah on Mount Sinai.

General Practices: Evening of devotional programs and studying the Torah, lighting of Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the second night of Shavuot.

Date details: Begins at sundown the first date listed.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on these days. (Kosher basics—although it is customary to eat dairy).

June

March 10-April 8, 2024

March 1-March 30, 2025
Feb. 18-March 19, 2026

Feb. 8- March 9, 2027

Ramadan – Begins at Sundown (Islamic)

 

Ramadan is an occasion to focus on faith through fasting and prayer, and is one of the most important Muslim holidays. Ramadan is notable because the Qur’an was first revealed during this month, and Muslims see the Qur’an as the ultimate form of guidance for mankind. The night that the Qur’an was revealed to Muhammad is called Lailat ul Oadr, and standing in prayer this one night is thought to eclipse months of worship.

General Practices: Fasting is required during the entire month of Ramadan. Muslims refrain from food and beverages during the daylight hours, and smoking and sexual relations are forbidden. Worshipers break the fasting each night with prayer, reading of the Qu’ran, and a meal called the iftar. In addition, many Muslims also attend night prayers at Mosques. Muslims also believe that their good actions bring a greater reward during this month than any other time of the year, so almost all Muslims try to give up bad habits during Ramadan.

Date Details: Dates are determined by the lunar calendar. Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice.  The observed date marks the beginning of a 30 day observation.

Recommended Accommodations: If possible, avoid scheduling major academic deadlines during this time. Be sensitive to the fact that students and employees celebrating Ramadan will be fasting during the day (continuously for 30 days) and will likely have less stamina as a result. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (Islamic dietary restrictions apply).

June 21, 2024

June 21, 2025

June 21, 2026

June 21, 2027

Litha/Midsomer/Alban Hefin/Summer Solstice (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid)

 

A celebration of the longest day of the year and the beginning of summer. Celebration of the the Goddess manifesting as Mother Earth and the God as the Sun King. For some Pagans the Summer Solstice marks the marriage of the God and Goddess and see their union as the force that creates the harvest’s fruits. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

General Practices: Lighting to bonfires and watching the sun rise

April 9-10, 2024

March 30-31, 2025
March 19-20, 2026
March 9-10, 2027

Eid al-Fitr – Begins at Sundown (Islamic)

 

Holiday with significant work restriction

Eid al-Fitr means “break the fast”, and is the last day of Ramadan, marking the end of a month of fasting.

General Practices: Muslims often pray, exchange gifts, give money to children, feast, and celebrate with friends and family.

Date Details: Dates are determined by the lunar calendar. Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice. Eid al Fitr is a three day celebration and begins at sundown.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. Employees will likely ask to take a vacation day on this day, and that request should be granted if at all possible.  If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (Islamic dietary restrictions apply).

July

Aug. 12-13, 2024

Aug. 2-3, 2025
July 23-24, 2026

Aug. 11-12, 2027

Tisha B’Av – Begins at Sundown (Jewish)

 

Commemorates a series of Jewish tragedies including the destruction of the first and second temples in Jerusalem.

General practices: Fasting and mourning.

Date details: Begins at sundown on first day, fast deferred because of the Sabbath.

Recommended accommodations: Plan limited activities after a fast.

Adapted from the University of Missouri Kansas City Religious Holiday Calendar