Advancing Biomedical Science

The Laboratory for Clinical Biochemistry Research (LCBR) focuses on understanding risk factors for heart disease, stroke, venous thrombosis, obesity, diabetes, aging, and frailty using a wide variety of assays in population and family-based research settings, particularly in the areas of coagulation, fibrinolysis, thrombosis, inflammation, and immune system function. These results are linked to animal model studies, especially research in murine atherosclerosis


Image of the Colchester Research Facility

Clinical Studies

The Laboratory research portfolio includes molecular and genetic epidemiology family-based genetic research, clinical trials and basic studies using murine models of disease.

Dr. Olson removing samples from one of the LCBR freezers.

Technical Information

The LCBR Faculty and staff has accumulated a vast amount and diverse range of experience working with and developing multitudes of clinical assays, including information regarding Luminex Overview, and Luminex Data by Analyte.

Drs. Cushman and Zakai discussing research

Collaborations

The Laboratory staff have collaborated on a wide variety of clinical studies, clinical trials, and epidemiology studies on local, national, and international scales.

Faculty Spotlight

Mary Cushman, M.D.

Cushman Receives American Heart Association's Award of Meritorious Achievement

 

Over the last three decades, Mary Cushman, M.D., M.Sc., has emerged as a national leader in cardiovascular health. In recognition of her important service to the American Heart Association (AHA), she will receive the AHA’s 2020 Award of Meritorious Achievement during the association’s live stream event in October. Dr. Cushman, who has worked on dozens of AHA committees, co-authored countless papers and won numerous awards, has made far-reaching contributions on the local, regional and national levels. She currently serves as the chair of the Go Red for Women in Science and Medicine Task Force, which works to help women understand their risk of heart disease and recently served on the AHA’s national board of directors.